Temples of Ueno Park, Tokyo| Explore Japan

Temples of Ueno Park, Tokyo| Explore Japan

On our first day in Japan my friend and I went to Ueno Park in Tokyo. It was an amazing first stop and there is so much to see that I  decided to make two posts about the park. This is post two and it is all about the temples in the park. There are a lot, and so many in the surrounding area too.

You can purchase these little blank notebooks at the temples. You take the notebook to each temple you visit and some of the temples have these special temple stamps that they will paint into your notebook. They looked so beautiful and while I didn’t purchase one, my friend did and it was really interesting to see the different designs from each of the temples we visited.

Kaneiji Temple

Also for purchase at the temples are little prayer ribbons, incense candles and fortunes. There are so many fortunes for everything from safe travels to good luck to safe driving (there were a lot for safe driving).

Ueno Park was originally the grounds of the Kan-Eiji Temple. This temple was the family temple of Tokugawas during the Edo Period. It was one of the largest in the city and was meant to protect the city of Tokyo from evil. In 1868 the temple was damaged during a war and after the war ended the temple grounds were converted into a park open to the public.

Kaneiji Temple

Kaneiji Temple

Kaneiji Temple

Kaneiji Temple

Kaneiji Temple

Kaneiji Temple

 

The next temple we visited was the Gokoku-in Temple. This temple was founded in 1630 and was part of the greater Kaneiji Temple. Several parts of the temple have been renovated and reconstructed over the years to retain it as a piece of history and culture.

Gokoku-In Temple

Gokoku-In Temple

Gokoku-In Temple

Gokoku-In Temple

Gokoku-In Temple

Gokoku-In Temple

Gokoku-In Temple

Gokoku-In Temple

I really enjoyed visiting the Gokoku-in Temple, the area outside the temple is really pretty and calming and the inside was amazing to see. There were so many different features that my camera just can’t do justice and so I recommend checking out this temple when visiting Tokyo. It is custom when entering the temple to remove your shoes (as with most sacred Asian sites).

Tennoji Temple

Tennoji Temple was originally constructed in 1274 and finished in the 17th Century. It is home to a bronze Buddha and the Goddess of Mercy. It is at the edge of the Yanaka cemetery. The temple was greatly destroyed in the 1800’s during the Japanese Civil War but the Buddha remained unharmed and thus exists in good condition today. In front of Buddha you will see a little structure for incense to be burned. The incense are available for purchase inside the temple.

Tennoji Temple

Tennoji Temple

Tennoji Temple

Tennoji Temple

 

The last temple we explored in the park was Kiyomizu Kannondo which was built in 1631 as part of the Kaneiji Temple and is home to the Goddess of Conception.

Kiyomizu Kannondo

Kiyomizu Kannondo

Kiyomizu Kannondo

Kiyomizu Kannondo

Kiyomizu Kannondo

Kiyomizu Kannondo

 

I hope you enjoyed this little Temple Tour of Ueno Park. I would definitely add this park to the itinerary for Tokyo if you ware planning on travelling there.

Have you been here? Let me know about your experience!

Happy Travels!

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